Bednall Collection: No.s 851 to 875

The Bednall Archive 

Last updated 04/05/2004


REFERENCE 851 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Cruso; Littleton;

DESCRIPTION A copy of the resolutions of a meeting of the Silk Trade held in the Town Hall, Leek, Staffordshire on 20 February 1824 which were sent up to Mr. Littleton to act upon. The meeting agreed that the proposed reductions in duty on raw silk which were to take place from 5th July next would be highly injurious to the interests of the trade and bring distress upon the workers in the industry. They suggested that the introduction of the reductions either be staged or an allowance equal to the duty on the stock in hand raw and manufactured. 

 

REFERENCE 852 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Cruso; Littleton; Wrottesley; Gibson; Critchley;

DESCRIPTION Copy (probably by John Cruso) to Mr.Badnall of a vindication of Mr. Littleton 13 March 1824. " At 2.0 o'clock to-day I heard that Leek was not to be one of the depots for the receipt of manufacturers' stock". The writer (Cruso) then went to see Littleton who had written strongly to Mr.Robinson to request that a depot be established at Leek. The letter defends Littleton's actions and states "his exertions have been unremitting and most certainly unexampled by any member in the House of Commons". Unlikely to have obtained what has been obtained if he had not voted for the measure "they would not have listened to him. " "What has John Wrottesley done in the business? Nothing".
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REFERENCE 853 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso; Littleton; Daintry;

DESCRIPTION Draft letter from (probably) John Cruso in London to Richard Badnall, senior, in Leek, Staffordshire dated about March 1824. Concerns Cruso's visit to Mr. Littleton to discuss the silk question and states that after making enquiries Littleton was "perfectly satisfied that an open trade will be to the advantage of all country manufacturers." States that he his still puzzled as to how to arrange for stocks in hand and suggests the possibility of drafting a plan to allow drawbacks be considered. The letter was dated the day before the vote in the House of Commons on proposals to reduce the duties on raw silk and to remove prohibitions on the import of manufactured silk goods. Littleton was going to vote in favour of the general plan in principle on condition that the Chancellor allows the prohibition of French silks for some years. Littleton took Cruso to see Mr.Robinson who he said "is most anxious to meet the views of the country manufacturers with respect to stock in hand and will allow a prohibition for 2 or 3 years." "It appears to be allowed on all hands that the French cannot make sewing silks so that Mr.Gaunt must be mistaken when he said he had seen as good sewing silk that was made in France as ever he saw made in England. In fancy goods France cannot compete with England and as to all other goods it appears to be the opinion of those who know the French manufacture and the better thinking part of the trade, that England can compete with the French in almost all French goods but there may be some in which they can not". "As to Labour, that is certainly cheaper in France than in England but then there will always be a duty upon French and Foreign manufactured silks and the duty taken of the silks will be adequate to the difference in price of labour and thereby enable the English manufacturer to compete with the French if not undersell them. The English manufacturer may also go to Italy, France or any other country and buy raw material and can not the English spin silk as well as raw cotton. The Broker will of course be injured and so will the merchant but not the manufacturer. The manufacturer may in a great degree be independent of the broker which he can not be upon the present system of the silk trade --This I understand to be the opinion of many." "It is also the opinion that silks will immediately rise and that more silk will be consumed as silks will be still more worn." Cruso went on to say that he had gone to Littleton because" no one being up from Leek and it being most clearly ascertained that the Chancellor of the Exchequer will carry his point, I was induced by Mr. Ryle to then see Mr. Littleton and endeavour to get something done with respect to stock in hand". He and Daintry were to see Littleton the following day at eleven and Cruso was dining with Daintry that day and proposed to talk the matter over with him before going. He said he wished "Richard or yourself had been in Town - Mr.L seems most anxious upon the subject and if therefore by voting with his conscience should vote contrary to his Leek friends I must in great measure take the blame". On the bottom of the draft is the following list of expenses : Umbrella 10s 6d; Dinner 14s 6d; Play 7s 4d; Gell Passport 2 7s 6d; Lodgings 12s 6d.

 

REFERENCE 854 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso;

DESCRIPTION Draft proposition, dated 12 March 1824, at Weavers Hall, concerning depots for silk stocks in the hands of manufacturers prior to 25 March 1824. Proposes that manufacturers in London and country towns prepare a safe room and collect stock into it. Give notice to officers appointed to take possession of it by putting a lock and seal on the door -the manufacturer to prepare a blank schedule. All depots to be secured by the officers by the 25th March. Officers to be named in the Districts without delay. When lists are sent to the Officer before 25 March he should on the 26th proceed to liberate the stocks in the same succession as the lists had been compiled. Proposal would obviate difficulty and expense of providing depots and guard the goods from risk of confusion and great injury that would result from their being tumbled about. Inside it states "General Association of the Silk Trade. the following resolutions was this day reported and agreed to by the House of Commons. That one half of the Bounties on the ..portation of silk manufactured shall be allowed on all such manufactures and having been warehoused shall be taken out for home consumption within 30 days after the 5th April 1824 . Weavers Hall, 12 March 1824.
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231

 

REFERENCE 855 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso; Littleton;

DESCRIPTION Silk Trade- Draft statement for Mr. Littleton concerning the repeal of the silk duties - probably dated in the first quarter of 1824 (paper watermarked 1817). A small part was written by John Cruso. The first page lists reasons for acceding to the principle of the proposed measure including -opening of new markets to British manufacturers; stimulation of weaving machinery improvement; widen the range of silks available on the market; elimination of rich merchant monopolies on imports of Italian and Bengal silks. It suggests 5 or 6 years be allowed before French Silks are admitted as it would enable the country to prepare, improve manufacturing and ultimately compete with the French. As regards sewing silks which are principally manufactured in Leek and other Towns in the North, - they will find a ready market in every part of the World - the principal rival was China from which the American market was supplied "although even now great quantities of sewing silks are exported to that Country from England" - it was expected that the removal of duties would give impetus to this branch of the trade. States that there is a principle that the more raw silk we can get and the cheaper we can get it the more is the country benefited in giving employment to the people and added worth of the Nation. Stresses that it is therefore important that the throwing and preparation of raw silk should, as in the cotton trade, be gone through here. Argues that this implies a strong protecting duty on foreign thrown silk or if the present protection is too high a maximum reduction of no more that 5/- per lb of silk. Stresses the need for great caution in view of the great value of the article with the present high duties - the amount of capital employed - numbers of persons involved - warns of serious consequences if indemnity is not provided for stocks in hand before importation of French goods is admitted. The writer suggests (1) a return of duty paid on silks cleared for the India and Customs Houses since 1st November last; (2) continued prohibition of French goods for 5 or 3 years; (3) with the above indemnity and protection let off the duties instantly; (4) make the reduction on foreign thrown silks the same as on raw silk viz. 5/- per lb. A note states that the present duty on thrown silk was 14/8 per lb from which the Chancellor proposed to take off 7/2 leaving the duty at 7/6 whereas the writer's proposal would keep the duty at 9/8 or (if pressed) 8/8. It suggests all imported wrought goods be stamped as a product of France and that " China & Indian wrought goods should and it is presumed will still be totally prohibited."

 

REFERENCE 856 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Macclesfield, Cheshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Pearson; Hopes; Grimsditch;

DESCRIPTION Petition for the silk manufacturers, silk dyers and silk throwsters of Macclesfield to the Right Honourable The Chancellor of the Exchequer drawn up at a meeting in Macclesfield on 18th March 1824 at which Samuel Pearson was in the Chair. William Hopes the pro temp secretary forwarded the document to M. Grimsditch in London for forwarding to the Chancellor. It opens by stating that they had heard with surprise and regret that certain persons connected with the silk trade in London proposed that the proposed compensation or drawback on stocks on hand be abandoned provided the period for admission of foreign silks was extended to five years and the proposed repeal of duties took place gradually at stated periods. They state that however apprehensive they might be of their ability to compete with foreign manufacturers at the end of the proposed two year period for prohibition and that thus an extension of prohibition to a longer period might be desirable "yet your Memorialists are most anxious to avoid any disturbance of the existing arrangement as the effect would be to destroy the trade for the present year." The Macclesfield Memorialists stated they were principally concerned in the manufacture of silks and holders of large stocks and in consequence of the resolutions of the House of Commons published in the London Gazette have actually at their own expence hired and engaged depots and taken other necessary steps for warehousing their goods which have been attended with considerable inconvenience and loss of employment to the operative class." The Memorialists therefore proposed that the existing government proposals be put into effect and the duties repealed at the date already fixed. The memorial was unanimously agreed by the Macclesfield meeting.
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232

 

REFERENCE 857 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Macclesfield, Cheshire; Coventry; Nottingham; Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Alsop; Tunstall; Oldham;

DESCRIPTION Copy of the London Gazette Number 18009 pages 417 to 438 dated 13 March 1824. Page 431; Decree in Chancery in Alsop v Towgood the creditors of John Haywood Alsop late of Leek, Staffordshire, silk manufacturer who died on 7th April 1823 to come forward to prove their debts. Page 439: Insolvent debtors William Oldham late of Macclesfield, butcher and also James Tunstall formerly of Manchester but late of Macclesfield, grocer; Page 420-421: Announcement by the Customs and Excise acting on the orders of the Treasury concerning the receipt into warehouses (at Coventry, Nottingham and Macclesfield) under the King's lock and at the expence and risk of the parties all raw and thrown silk and silk manufactures upon which duty shall have been paid provided the same is in quantities of not less than 300 lb weight and in the name of one party and it is all deposited before 25 March. All silk manufactures being new and uncut and wholly of silk be deposited in the warehouse before 5th April next to enable the parties to avail themselves of the return of the duties...bounties..." The resolutions of the House of Commons are given below together with the drawbacks allowable on stocks in hand". 

 

REFERENCE 858 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Gaunt; Lucas; Phillips; Cutting; Sterling; Wardle; Walmsley; Fynney ; Ward; Sutton; Glendining; Carr ; Thompson; Turner; Milward; Brough;

DESCRIPTION Memorial to the Lords of the Treasury from the silk manufacturers of Leek, Staffordshire claiming an allowance on Legee Twist, Silk & Mohair, and Silk & Worsted. The paper is watermarked 1823. This is an improved copy or version of Bed. Coll. 849. In this the quantity of Twist belonging to Leek Silk Manufacturers is given as of Silk & Mohair and Silk and Worsted about 3200 altogether and the grand total according to official returns was 4450 lbs. The document was signed by Richard Badnall; Gaunt & Lucas; Phillips, Cutting & Sterling; Gaunt, Wardle & Walmsley; Fynney & Ward; Thomas Sutton & Co.; Glendining & Gaunt; Carr & Thompson; James Turner; Samuel Milward and John Brough. 

 

REFERENCE 859 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London; Macclesfield, Congleton, Cheshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall;

DESCRIPTION Silk Trade...... Document carrying the heading "to Mr.Badnall and Statement of Facts and Suggestions". It reviews the current and prospective duties on foreign silks both raw and thrown and indicates the proposed changes favour the Italian throwing industry and as a result " In the towns of Macclesfield and Congleton alone many thousands of the working classes would be thrown out of employment and numerous factories of great value would become useless" . A note written in another hand states here "This bears upon Mr.Badnall". The present duties on raw silk were East Indian silk 4/- and Chinese and Italian Silks 5/6. The Chancellor proposed to reduce these to 3s and 6s respectively. The writer mentions the effects which the Chancellor's actions to-date had already had " there has already been a total stoppage of the Spring trade -not a single piece of goods can be sold by the Manufacturers to the Retailer, nor is a single article applied for by the Public to the Retailer, neither will the Merchant, the Broker, the Silkman, nor the Manufacturer clear from the India or Custom House a single bale of raw silk sold at the last sales; and the further consequence must inevitably be that all those working people who are employed in the throwing, preparation, and weaving of silks will be thrown out of work and distress and ruin must inevitably fall upon the great body of the holders of stock which has paid the duty." Amongst the points raised is that " serious consideration as to whether or not China and Indian wrought silks ought to be admitted upon any terms because it is well known that whatever might be the rate of duty imposed they would be brought over in immense quantities by persons returning from those regions (as a means of getting home their wealth) and sold at prices with which or England could compete. In France they are wholly prohibited."
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233

 

REFERENCE 860 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London; Coventry;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Grellier; Badnall;

DESCRIPTION (1) Printed letter from P.P Grellier & Son, Silk Brokers dated 9 March 1824 concerning "the declaration by the Chancellor last night in the House, respecting the Silk Duties, we beg to hand you particulars. At the same time we have to remark, it appears the present determination of the Ministers to carry into effect the system of removing the prohibitory laws. There is great division in the Trade as to the Time when it will take place; and a deputation, with a strong Memorial, will wait upon the Minister this evening upon the subject." Details of the House of Commons resolutions follow. (2) is a printed circular from Grellier & Son dated 10 March 1824, Wormwood Street, which gives " The following are the particulars in answer (this day) to the Deputation from Coventry". 

 

REFERENCE 861 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Thorpe, Derbyshire; London; Scarborough, Yorkshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Shaw; Burnett;

DESCRIPTION Bundle of 9 letters relating to the illness and death of William Beaumont Badnall including letters between Challinor and Shaw and Mrs. J. E. Badnall. Mainly written between May and June 1901 but includes letter dated 12 Nov 1903 concerning the Badnall Memorial Service at Thorpe. (1) 15 May 1901 Draft letter from J. Challinor to Minnie (Mrs. Badnall) concerns William Beaumont Badnall signing an authority to his bank re payment of cheques signed by (probably) his wife. (2) 25 May 1901 Letter from Mrs. J.E.Badnall to Mr.Shaw asking him and his daughter to spend a weekend with her from 6th June. Says Mr.J. Challinor far from well. (3) 25 May 1901 Letter from Mrs. J. E. Badnall to Mr.Joe Challinor.."My precious husband is very ill - The Doctor.. It breaks my heart to see him suffer ...... without an operation which in his weak state would have killed him... (4) 29 May 1901 Letter from Mrs. J. E. Badnall to Mr.Joe Challinor. Doctors just been arranged for operation at 3 o'clock tomorrow they have told William and he quietly consented and thought it should be for the best. he will not think of it much in the night. I do not think the Doctors are quite so hopeful about his bearing it but the trial must be made. (5) 29 May 1901 Letter from Thomas Shaw to Mr.Challinor. Sorry to hear Doctors think an operation necessary in Mr.Badnall's case bearing in mind his weakness and age. States his intention to go to London to stay at the Howard Hotel, Norfolk Street, Victoria Embankment and that he would visit Mrs. Badnall on his return. Also contains other family information. (6) 31 May 1901 Note by Challinor states "Mr.Badnall died 8pm today." On the other side the draft for a telegram "Passed peacefully away 8 o'clock need not come here Badnall". (7) May 1901 Draft letter authority to Bank requesting that cheques drawn in "my name by my wife Jane Elizabeth Badnall" be honoured. (8) 11 June 1901 Letter from G.S. Burnett at Winkburn to Challinor & Co. expressing his regret at the announcement of Mr.Badnall's death. (9) 13 November 1903 Letter form Joe Challinor to Thomas Shaw re the Badnall Memorial Service -"passed off very nicely - the church filled. Mrs. Badnall was very pleased.." Challinor expressed his regret at not being able to see Shaw before he (Challinor) left for Percy's Scalby House, Scarborough where he and his wife were to remain for a week. 

 

REFERENCE 862 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor;

DESCRIPTION Letter dated 10 June 1879 from Joseph Challinor at Euston Station, to William Beaumont Badnall (in pencil). Concerns : Challinor's office bills for the years 1876, 1877, 1878 which he estimated amounted to 11,260 from which his proportions for Clerks, rent and annual office expenses would have to be deducted, viz. about 3000. William Challinor's bills for the same years amounted to 6234 from which would have to be deducted his proportion of annual office payments viz. 2500. This makes together for the three years WC net 3734=2/5 = 4800 JC net 8260 = 3/5 = 7200. If future profits to be divided 2/5 to WC and 3/5 to JC yearly income would be JC 2400 and WC 1600. Joseph Challinor went on to point out that " you will observe that by this suggested division my Brother would get 1000 more in the three years than the proportion ...to have been earned by him and I almost 100 less- therefore the division into 2/3rds & 1/3rd would be more nearly correct".
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234

 

REFERENCE 863 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Cruso;

DESCRIPTION Copy, dated 18 May 1851, of a memorandum re the agreement of partnership entered into between William Beaumont Badnall, Joseph Challinor and William Challinor, solicitors of Leek, Staffordshire. The memo states that not withstanding the agreement, that as regards any business agency or appointment of an extraordinary nature obtained by the special influence or exertions of a partner then that partner was to have one half of the profits and the other partners the other half between them. The memorandum was entered into by the partners as a consequence of Mr.William Challinor's profits from Railway business. An NB states that "Agreed that if we do not obtain the clerkship of the Union after Mr J. Cruso Mr W. Challinor to have profits of Taxes himself".

 

REFERENCE 864 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Shaw;

DESCRIPTION Officially stamped and signed agreement of partnership between Mr.William Challinor and Mr.Joseph Challinor dated 2nd November 1863. To the document are attached additional notes dated 16 September 1873 and 1 October 1873, a modification of partnership signed, stamped and dated 1 October 1873 and a further note dated 11 September 1877. The new agreement of 1863 was a consequence of William Beaumont Badnall leaving to practice as a barrister in London. An agreement drawn up on 22 October 1862 had assured payments from the partnership to Badnall of 103 -10s for a period of 7 years and 100 yearly extra to Joseph Challinor commencing from 13 May 1864. The new partnership was to commence on 7 October 1862 and end on 1st July 1871. Profits after paying the above mentioned sums were to be divided equally between the partners. Each partner was entitled to receive 500 a year from 1st January 1863 with an exact adjustment of profits being made on 1st January 1865 and every third successive July thereafter. Monies advanced by one partner or the other to the partnership were to receive interest at 5%. The note dated 11 September 1877 states that it was agreed that the partnership agreements of 2 November 1863 and 1st October 1873 should continue in force not withstanding the agreement of sub-partnership of 23 August 1877 ""between ourselves and Mr Thomas Shaw".

 

REFERENCE 865 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor;

DESCRIPTION Officially stamped and signed agreement of partnership in the "profession or practice of attorneys and solicitors" between Mr.William Challinor, William Beaumont Badnall and Mr.Joseph Challinor, all of Leek, Staffordshire, dated 16th May 1851. The agreement was to remain effective for 14 years as from the 19th May 1850. Profits up to 1500 per year to be shared 11/24th to William Challinor, and the remaining 13/24ths to W.B.Badnall and Joseph Challinor equally. Profits above 1500 were to be shared equally. William Challinor was to be allowed to draw 350 per annum and W.B.Badnall and Joseph Challinor 200 per annum each so long as the profits justified this. On the withdrawal of any partner the others were to purchase his share at 2.5 times the average profit of his share for the previous 3 years or if they prefer the continuing partners may pay out a yearly sum for a term of years as shall be of equivalent value. Any partner leaving the partnership would not be able to practice within 20 miles of Leek.
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235

 

REFERENCE 866 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Shaw;

DESCRIPTION Messrs Challinor Badnall & Challinor, and Messrs Challinor & Co. solicitors, Leek, Staffordshire, statement of net profits of office bills from 10 May 1850 to 31 October 1881. The partner who kept the accounts received an honorarium of 100 for a period of 6 years in the case of W. B. Badnall. Badnall kept the books from May 1853 until February 1861. The profits of Challinor Badnall & Challinor's office bills form 13 May 1850 until 7 October 1862 were 24560 12s 11d. The profits of Challinor & Co. from 7 October 1862 until 31 December 1881 were 67248 10s 11d. The profits were divided as follows 43030 2s 5d to William Challinor; 6824 2s 6d to Mr.William Beaumont Badnall and 41954. 18s 11d to Mr Joseph Challinor.

 

REFERENCE 867 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Hall; Cooper;

DESCRIPTION Trustees of Mr.and Mrs. William Beaumont Badnall's marriage trust -concerning the sale of land near the Cattle Market in Leek, Staffordshire -Copied 2/9/1873. Bill relating to William Challinor's expenses  37 7s 3d

 

REFERENCE 868 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Thorpe, Buxton, Derbyshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Shaw; Goodman; May; Cock; Wright; Aspinall; Roebuck; Cruso; Craven; Nivin; Deacon; Lockyer; Machell; Knight; Searight; Northcott; Adams; Acton;

DESCRIPTION Draft codicil to the will of Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Badnall of Thorpe, Derbyshire, widow, dated 11 May 1912 and revoked by a new codicil dated 16 February 1916, Challinors & Shaw, Solicitors, Leek, Staffordshire. It opens with the statement "..my dear husband died on the 31st May 1901 and was buried in the Parish Church Yard of Thorpe where I wish to be buried.." and also notes that Joseph Challinor one of her executors and trustees died on 31 May 1910 and Charles May a nephew and beneficiary under her husbands will had died a bachelor in Bechuanaland on 7 September 1902. A pencilled in note states "Thomas Shaw another executor and trustee of my will died 30 January 1913. She appointed Arthur Hugh Shaw of Leek and Godfrey Davenport Goodman of Buxton, Derbyshire  executors, etc. in place of those who had died.

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REFERENCE 869 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Thorpe, Buxton, Derbyshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Shaw; Goodman; May; Cock; Wright; Aspinall; Buck; Cruso; Craven; Nivin; Deacon; Lockyer; Machell; Knight; Searight; Northcott; Adams; Acton; Angus; Higham; Lucas; Smith; Milnes; O'Conner; Towndrow; Frost; Booth; Bridgwater;

DESCRIPTION Copy of the codicil to the will of Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Badnall of Thorpe, Derbyshire, widow, dated 11 May 1912 and revoked by a new codicil dated 16 February 1916, Challinors & Shaw, Solicitors, Leek, Staffordshire. She appointed Arthur Hugh Shaw of Leek and Godfrey Davenport Goodman of Buxton, Derbyshire executors, etc. in place of those who had died. Originally she had bequeathed 2000 to her cousin Elizabeth Craven; 3000 to her cousin Mary Elizabeth Roe Buck or in case of her death in testator's lifetime to her children and issue; to her trustees 3000 in favour of her cousin Henry Beaumont Cruso, his wife and children; to her trustees in favour of her cousin Evelyn Aspinall who had since died leaving one child named Hilda; 500 to her cousin Elizabeth Margaret Acton; 500 to her cousin Charlotte Millicent Deacon; 100 to St. Mary's Hospital, Paddington; 200 to my maid Mary Jane Cock; 50 to my servant Mary Wright. The codicil revoked the bequests to Edith Craven, Evelyn Aspinall and St. Mary's Hospital, reduced those to Mary E. R. Buck and H. B. Cruso to 2500 and those to C. M. Deacon and E. M. Acton were reduced to 200. The bequests to her servants were made payable whether they were in her service or not at the time of her death. Articles were also bequeathed, in particular: her string of Indian pearls bequeathed to the testatrix by her Aunt Cruso to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Beaumont Cruso or, if she had died, to Mary Elizabeth's sister Florence Nivin, wife of Reverend Ernest Fielden Nivin; a handsome silver tea pot, sugar basin and cream jug inscribed with the Cruso crest and the old silver mustard pot which belonged to testatrix's grandfather Cruso to John Cruso the son of Henry Beaumont Cruso; a diamond cross left to testatrix by her Aunt Cruso to Catherine Cruso sister of H.B.Cruso; "my old china which came from Dunstan Hall and the black cabinet in which it is contained in the Drawing Room to my cousin Lawrence Assheton Craven; my sable furs and sealskin jacket which belonged to my late Aunt Margaret smith to my cousin Elizabeth Margaret Acton; my Queen Anne silver Waiter and small silver teapot engraved with the letter M and my perforated plated sugar basin the gifts of my late Aunt Margaret Smith to Elizabeth Margaret Acton and after her death to my cousin Blanche Constance Angus absolutely; my ring with a round cluster of diamonds to B. C. Angus; my diamond crescent broach and the following miniatures -5 in one velvet case, two in another and the miniatures of my Uncle and aunt Smith Milnes, and also the water colour painting of my Grandmother Mrs. Smith of Dunstan Hall to my cousin Charlotte Millicent Deacon; a framed portrait of my husband (William Beaumont Badnall) to my nephew Herbert Owen Badnall; my fluted broad gold bracelet, my ring set with oval diamond cluster and my gold watch with monogram J.E.B on the back and small chain attached to Blanche the daughter of my nephew Herbert Owen Badnall; my gold locket with diamond in the centre and containing my dear husband's likeness and my two silver plated candelabra to my niece Florence Wilson; my pearl and diamond ring to my niece Alice O'Conner; my large paste buckle, the portrait supposed to be that of Mrs. Hopkins the Great Grandmother of my late husband and the miniature portrait (in a red dress) of Mrs. Cruso formerly Badnall first wife of my late Uncle John Cruso and my two pencil miniatures in oval black frames and my travelling bag with silver and glass fittings to my niece Gertrude Badnall; my plain gold bracelet with three diamonds and my pair of old paste shoe buckles to my niece Ethel Badnall. To my nieces Gertrude and Ethel Badnall or the survivor of them my four silver desert spoons engraved with peacocks feathers. To my niece Evelyn Northcote formerly Badnall my desert knives and forks with mother of pearl handles, turquoise locket with gold neck chain, turquoise forget-me-not brooch, case of fish knives and forks, nine cheese eater knives, large electro waiter or small tray, Sheffield plate coffee pot (very ancient) Electro egg basket with cups and four silver egg spoons with Badnall crest on, electro small coffee pot, electro hot water jug, pair of silver sugar nippers of the open pattern which belonged to her Grandmother Mrs. Badnall. To my niece Ada Harriet Searight my six antique Apostle desert spoons; To my niece Maude Elizabeth Lockyer my large electro plated tea tray, my silver cream jug inscribed with J.E.C, my gold locket with amethyst in centre, my two gold bangles, my old small paste star pendant and my Gipsy ring with emerald and two diamonds, also my four plated entree dishes and my plated hot water dish. To my niece Constance Machel my gold cable bracelet and the two painted photographic likenesses of my late husband and my self. To my cousin Violet Knight my four old fashioned plated salt cellars and mustard pot. To my friend Matilda Pembroke Jones my tortoiseshell writing desk and workbox inlaid with brass and my ivory card case. To my nephew Reginald Beaumont Badnall the portrait in oil of Richard Badnall the father of my late husband, my four silver table spoons, silver fish slice, silver soup ladle all marked with W.B. To my nephew Lancelot Wykeham Badnall the water colour miniature portrait in a black frame of the said Richard Badnall and the crayon portrait of the said Richard Badnall now in my Library at Thorpe. To my cousin Henry Beaumont Cruso my silver articles with the Cruso crest inscribed thereon not otherwise disposed of. She required her executors to hand over any other portraits, photographs of relatives, ancestors or friends of my husband and myself and clothing not disposed of to living relatives whose ancestors they were. Other legacies : to Arthur Hugh Shaw 100; to Godfrey Davenport Boothman 100; to Hilda only child of Evelyn Aspinall 1000; to Reginald Beaumont Badnall 100; to my nieces and nephews Herbert Owen Badnall, Lancelot Wykeham Badnall; Walter Edward May, Grace Adams, and Alice O'Conner 100 each; to Gertrude and Ethel Badnall 100 each in addition to the legacies of 100 bequeathed to them in my will; to Evelyn Northcote 400 if she survives me, if not, then to her two children Honor Northcote and Ralph Northcote equally. The testatrix's share in the sums set aside under the will of her late Aunt Margaret Smith to provide an annuity for Ann Towndrow. To Ralph Northcote she left 100. To Constance Machel and Ada Harriet Searight 20 guineas each and to her second cousin Mary Elizabeth Cruso 100. To her second cousin Florence Nivin formerly Cruso she left 600 which in the event of Florence's death was to go to her husband. The testatrix left 10 to her executors which was to be used to pay for the cleaning and restoration of a large oil painting of her mother, her father and herself which she bequeathed to H.B. Cruso. To the Cottage Hospital at Ashbourne she left 100. To her companion Clara Elizabeth Farrall she gave 150 and a further 150 "if still in my employ" when the testatorix died. To her servants Mary Jane Cock and Elizabeth Wright she bequeathed 100 and 50 respectively in addition to sums bequeathed in her will. To Jane the widow of her late servant Andrew Booth she left 100 and to her servant Samuel Frost, if in her sevice when she died, 50. To Albert Bridgwater, her coachman, she left 40 subject to a similar condition. Mary Jane Cock was also to be allowed household furniture and other articles on a list which the testatorix intended to leave, "which should be "sufficient and suitable for furnishing and making comfortable a small residence for her". Mary Jane was also to have any clothing not otherwise beqeathed. She left 100 to the Rector and Churchwardens of the Parish Church of Thorpe to be invested and the income used to maintain and insure the East window placed by her late husband and herself and secondly towards keeping the church fabric in repair "imposing it as a trust on condition that her husband's grave, tombstone and inscription thereon should be kept in repair by them". Subject to certain conditions, she also bequeathed her servants Mary Jane Cock and Elizabeth Wright annuities of 100 and 40 respectively. The residue of her estate was to be held in trust for the children of the Venerable Hopkins Badnall and Harriet Hopkins May or their issue. The codicil was witnessed by Ernest Higham, Clerk in Holy Orders, the Rectory, Thorpe, Ashbourne and George Dacres Lucas, The Old House, Thorpe, Ashbourne, Gentleman.

Page 237

 

REFERENCE 870 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Thorpe, Buxton, Derbyshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Shaw; Goodman; May; Cock; Wright; Aspinall; Buck; Cruso; Craven; Nivin; Deacon; Lockyer; Machell; Knight; Searight; Northcott; Adams; Acton; Angus; Higham; Lucas; Smith; Milnes; O'Conner; Towndrow; Frost; Booth; Bridgwater;

DESCRIPTION Copy of the will of Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Badnall of Thorpe, Derbyshire, widow, dated 25 March 1895 and codicils dated 16 February 1916, 6th March 1917, 21 January 1918, 13 June 1918, 31 July 1919. Challinors & Shaw, Solicitors, Leek, Staffordshire.

 

REFERENCE 871 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Thorpe, Buxton, Derbyshire; Toronto, Montreal, Ontario, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Perth, Western Australia; Surbiton, Surrey; Rhyl, Wales; Darlington; Exmouth, Devonshire; Biarritz, France; Canterbury; Cape Town, South Africa; Hyde Park, London; Ulverstone, Cumbria; Chippenham, Gloucestershire; Bath, Wiltshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Shaw; Goodman; May; Cock; Wright; Aspinall; Buck; Cruso; Craven; Nivin; Deacon; Lockyer; Machell; Knight; Searight; Northcott; Adams; Acton; Angus; Higham; Lucas; Smith; Milnes; O'Conner; Towndrow; Frost; Booth; Bridgwater; Bourne; Brown;

DESCRIPTION List of pecuniary legacies under the will and codicils of Mrs Jane Elizabeth Badnall of Thorpe near Ashbourne, Derbyshire deceased. Challinor & Shaw, solicitors, Leek, Staffordshire 22 January 1920. Gives names, addresses and amounts plus alterations in pencil.

 

REFERENCE 872 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Thorpe, Buxton, Derbyshire; etc.

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Shaw; Goodman; May; Cock; Wright; Aspinall; Buck; Cruso; Craven; Nivin; Deacon; Lockyer; Machell; Knight; Searight; Northcott; Adams; Acton; Angus; Higham; Lucas; Smith; Milnes; O'Conner; Towndrow; Frost; Booth; Bridgwater; Bourne; Brown;

DESCRIPTION List, dated 16 December 1919, of jewellery articles & other than apparel referred to in the Book of Instructions or memo as to articles to be given to Mrs. Deacon and other persons under the will of Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Badnall, deceased. Challinor & Shaw, solicitors, Leek, Staffordshire.

 

REFERENCE 873 LOCATION Box 7

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Thorpe, Buxton, Derbyshire; etc.

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS

DESCRIPTION List, dated 4 December 1919, of specific bequests under the will of Mrs. Jane Elizabeth Badnall, deceased. Challinor & Shaw, solicitors, Leek, Staffordshire.

Page 238

 

REFERENCE 874 LOCATION Box 16 Trunk 2

PLACES Leek, Hanley Staffordshire; Glasgow; Havorfordwest; Stafford; London; Guernsey;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Wood; Cruso; Brown; Whyte; Wuelbier; Gaunt; Sharpe; Starbuck; Hopkins; Billinge; Watson; Wilkinson; Sykes; Stephens; Freshfield; Dawes;

DESCRIPTION Mr.John William Wood, Miss Adolpha Wood and Mr.Edwin Joseph Wood in account with Cruso & Coupland 1824 to 1827. Richard Badnall of Highfield, Leek, Staffordshire was the guardian of the Wood children. This document mentions the marriage settlement of Mr.& Mrs. Wood whose two trustees were a John Grant and the Revd. Joseph Sharpe. In 1825 Mr.Grant resided on the Isle of Guernsey and this was confirmed by the Postmaster of Guernsey, Mr.Watson, who said Grant and his lady had resided there some 3 years. Others mentioned include the Revd. Adolphus Hopkins, Revd. G. H. Piercy, John Wood of Hanley and Mr.Dawes Accountant General to the Bank of England.

 

REFERENCE 875 LOCATION Box 16 Trunk 2

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Gaunt; Freshfield;

DESCRIPTION Sale of the Badnall estates, Leek, Staffordshire in 1827. Receipt dated 20 December 1827 from Freshfield & Sons to M. Gaunt, Esq. for the sum of 3328 1s 6d that being the balance of the purchase of the Highfield Estate (Lots 1 to 11) - 494 11s 6d and for the purchase of Heath House (Lot 39) - 2823 10s, Total 3328 1s 6d. Mr.Gaunt wanted a receipt with respect to Highfield for the balance less 44 11s 6d for fixtures and fittings and with respect to the conveyance of Heath House, for the whole amount. The receipt states that this receipt will therefore have to be exchanged for a modified one on completion of the conveyance.