Bednall Collection: No.s 826 to 850

The Bednall Archive 

Last updated 04/05/2004


REFERENCE 826 LOCATION Transfer Box 38

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London; Wincle, Macclesfield; Cheshire;

FIELD NAMES Lane House plantation; Chapel Meadow; Big Meadow;

PERSONS Badnall; Daintry; Shufflebotham; Bagshaw; Robinson; Curwen; Gaskell; Barton;

DESCRIPTION Surrender document involving John Cruso of Leek and William Beaumont Badnall of Leek acting at the request and direction of George Smith Daintry of 25 Woburn Place, Russell Square, London and James Shufflebotham of Wincle, yeoman, the purchaser of the property mentioned. The land was a two acre plantation called Lane House plantation. Two fields, called Chapel Meadow and Big Meadow, which had once been part of Lane Head Farm in Wincle are also mentioned. The property was proclaimed and surrendered in Macclesfield Forest Court on 1 January 1856 before R. Bagshaw, Deputy Steward and D.B.Curwen Deputy Clerk. Joseph Gaskell, Isaac Shufflebotham and Francis Robinson were witnesses. The Court note states " Seizin to Ralph Shufflebotham 1 o'clock.

 

REFERENCE 827 LOCATION Transfer Box 38

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Thorpe, Derbyshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; May; Challinor; Shaw;

DESCRIPTION Mr.  Badnall's opinion on an extract from Mr.  W. E. May's letter of 11th October 1891 & Messrs Challinor & Shaw's observations thereon. 15 October 1891. Badnall stated " Brokerage should be borne by all the beneficiaries equally; but that such of the Beneficiaries who have taken shares, should be treated as purchasers of such shares and should pay the cost of transfer."

 

REFERENCE 828 LOCATION Transfer Box 38

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Johnson; Beardmore; Cheetham;

DESCRIPTION Draft notice, dated 20 December 1859, from Messrs Challinor, Badnall & Challinor to Thomas Johnson and Thomas Beardmore to pay off a mortgage debt of £350 and interest under an indenture dated 27 April 1854 between (1) William Challinor, William Beaumont Badnall and Joseph Challinor, (2) Thomas Beardmore and Ann Booth his wife, (3) Elizabeth Cheetham, and also by virtue of a transfer made on 9 December 1859 between (1) Elizabeth Cheetham, (2 )Thomas Johnson and (3) Challinor & Co.
Page 222

 

REFERENCE 829 LOCATION Transfer Box 38

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso; Young;

DESCRIPTION Draft conditions of sale of lands belonging to Mr.  Barnett Young's trustee dated 19 June 1842. Note states " Made 3 copies 12 May 1842 3B.S each Wm Beaumont Badnall". Cruso, Leek. The lands were lots 1,2 and 3 near Leek particulars of which were given in an advertisement at the Red Lion Inn in Leek on Thursday 19 May 1842. The abstract of title was to commence with deeds dated 2 and 3rd September 1788.

 

REFERENCE 830 LOCATION Transfer Box 38

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Gaunt; Gould; Lovatt;

DESCRIPTION Draft letter, dated 23 December 1852, from William Challinor to William Beaumont Badnall concerning Miss Gaunt to Gould & Lovatt. It refers to three plots numbers 5, 6 and 7 on Miss Gaunt's plan totalling 2198 square yards.

 

REFERENCE 831 LOCATION Transfer Box 38

PLACES Liverpool;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall;

DESCRIPTION Draft will of Mrs. Sarah Badnall of Liverpool, widow, dated 19 May 1846. She bequeathed her medicine chest to her son James Rathbone Badnall and all the remainder of her personal estate and effects to Thomas Pratt Badnall and Joseph Badnall as her trustees and executors. A deleted section mentions her dear daughter Sarah Henrietta Badnall. Sarah Henrietta was to enjoy the benefit until she was married. Subsequently the trustees were to divide the testator's estate amongst her children. The piano forte was to be included in her daughter's share.

 

REFERENCE 832 LOCATION Transfer Box 38

PLACES Wavertree, Lancashire; Stockton on Tees, Durham; Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall;

DESCRIPTION Draft will of the Reverend William Badnall of Wavertree, Lancashire, clerk, dated 23 May 1846. He bequeathed his silver tea urn formerly belonging to his mother, to his son William Wykeham Badnall. The rest of his personal estate and effects he bequeathed to his nephews Hopkins Badnall of Stockton upon Tees, Durham, clerk, and William Beaumont Badnall of Leek, Staffordshire, gentleman as his trustees . The trustees were to pay all his debts, etc. and allow his wife Elizabeth to enjoy the use of his furniture and books and receive the interest, dividends, profits, etc. for life as long as she remained a widow. After her death or second marriage trustees were to auction or sell his effects, etc. and invest the proceeds for the maintenance, advancement and benefit of his children Mary Elizabeth, William Wykeham, James Arthur Robert and Harriet Martha, until the youngest reached the age of 21. Afterwards all was to be shared equally between his children. Three riders were appended : A- gave his wife power to sell some of his household goods, linen, books, etc. to provide extra income. B- and C- make other provisions for disposal of the estate, books , furniture, etc. 
Page 223

 

REFERENCE 833 LOCATION [AJK Marr]

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Kensington, London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Northcott;

DESCRIPTION Printed invitation to Mr. Joseph Challinor to attend the marriage of Mrs. Badnall's daughter Evelyn Elizabeth to Captain Frank Leonard Northcott at St Mary Abbott's, Kensington on Wednesday June 8th at half past one and afterwards at 26 Kensington Court Gardens. A handwritten note states 8 June 1898 Miss Badnall's marriage invitation.

 

REFERENCE 834 LOCATION Transfer Box 38

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Challinor; Herbert;

DESCRIPTION Two memos from G.S.Herbert & Sons, stock and share brokers of 73 Old Broad Street, London EC to Challinor & Co. re Mr. & Mrs. Badnall's Trust. (1) dated 14 January 1885 (2) dated 5 January 1885.

 

REFERENCE 835 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Ellis; Amory; Killmister;

DESCRIPTION Copy notes, dated February 1827, re the dissolution by mutual consent of the partnership between Richard Badnall the elder, and Richard Rogers Ellis as Bankers at Leek under the name of Badnall, Ellis & Co., on the 14th December 1826. Ellis's signature was witnessed by Samuel Amorey of Throckmorton Street, London. A separate note records Richard Badnall's confirmation of the dissolution dated 16 February 1827.

 

REFERENCE 836 LOCATION Not put away.

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London; Sheffield;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Ellis; Spilsbury; Cruso; Billinge; Walker; Kenyon; Knight; Brookfield; Preston; Stanley;

DESCRIPTION Draft summons from the Kenyon (Lord Chancellor?) to the Sheriff of Staffordshire commanding him to" take Richard Badnall the Elder, Richard Ellis, Richard Badnall the younger, Francis Gybbon Spilsbury and Henry Cruso late of Leek, Staffordshire, Bankers, the defendants in this suit so that they appear before us on the morrow of the Purification". To answer Thomas Walker, Samuel Walker, Jonathon Walker, Henry Walker, Vincent Henry Eyre and Richard Stanley plaintiffs in this suit in a plea of trespass. The document states that Badnall, Spilsbury and Cruso made or drew up a bill of exchange on 12 December 1825, in St. Mary le Bon, Cheap Ward, London which was directed to John Billinge. It required John Billinge to pay Badnall, Ellis & Co. £500 within two months. Billinge received the bill and on the same day and place indorsed the bill and delivered it to the plaintiffs. On 15 February 1826 the plaintiffs presented the bill to Billinge for payment. Billinge did not pay and the defendants became "according to the custom and the law of Merchants" liable. Thus on 1st January 1827 the defendants were said to owe £500 whereupon they then and there agreed to pay the plaintiffs the money. Defendants alleged not to have paid. Witnessed by Sir Charles Abbott Knight at Westminster 28 November 27 year of George IV. The notice appears to have been served on Richard Badnall the Elder, who was summoned to appear in the Court of the King's Bench on 3rd February 1827. On the back is written "John Preston 10 Fokerhouse Yard, For Chas. Brookfield, Sheffield 1st February 1827".

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REFERENCE 837 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Armitage, Rugeley, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso; Birch; Bostock; Salt;

DESCRIPTION Letter dated, 19 April 1817, from Thomas Birch of Armitage, to John Cruso & Son, Leek, Staffordshire in the case of Badnall & another versus Bostock. Birch states he had received their instructions to serve a copy of the process on the defendants but since the offence was a "bailable one" he and his clerk had been endeavouring to settle it. The defendant agreed to give a "Cognovit to pay the debt in instalments at 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, if this is unacceptable he has the bail ready. Birch thought the defendant was "not very safe" and they should "avoid being at much expense about him". "He is a writing clerk to Mr. Salt Attorney at Rugeley. The postscript states " I shall be happy to hear that Mr Cruso is in the way of a speedy recovery from his late unfortunate accident."

 

REFERENCE 838 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Armitage, Rugeley, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso; Whiteford; Bostock; Birch;

DESCRIPTION Letter, dated 17 April 1817, from Thomas Whiteford of Armitage, to John Cruso & Son, Leek, Staffordshire in the case of Badnall & another versus Bostock. Concerns receipt a quo a.... against Bostock received by Birch from Messrs Long & Austin. Long and Austin state Birch would receive instructions from the Cruso firm. Requests instructions.

 

REFERENCE 839 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Ellis; Killmister; Challinor;

DESCRIPTION Draft letter or note, dated 21 January 1827, from Killmister asking the person concerned to inform them -"as Mr. Badnall's solicitors" with a few lines explaining the nature of the arrangement, dissolution wished for by Captain Ellis. 

 

REFERENCE 840 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Ellis; Killmister; Challinor; Cruso; Spilsbury;

DESCRIPTION Draft additional case in re Badnall. It concerns the banking partnership Badnall, Ellis, Badnall jnr, Spilsbury and Cruso in the original form of which it "was understood between the parties that Mr. Badnall senior was to give the sanction of his name only and that no capital was to be advanced by him to the concern nor was he to be subject to any loss nor participate in any profit". The agreement was not put in writing. After the partnership had been formed Badnall, Spilsbury and Cruso began drawing more money out of the concern than was judged consistent with the interests of the business and therefore a notice of dissolution was signed on 5th August last. No agreement had ever been entered into on Mr. Badnall senior's suggestion that he and Captain Ellis carry on the bank between them nor on what the terms might be yet, nevertheless, the business is still being carried on under Mr. Badnall's direction and that of Captain Ellis, who is generally at Cheddleton. Mr. Ellis had recently asked Mr. Badnall, senior, to sign a notice of dissolution but Badnall had refused to do so. The bank had many debts owing most contracted by Badnall, Ellis, Spilsbury & Cruso. Mr. Badnall had assisted the bank from his own private funds and there was a balance in his favour. Counsel was asked to consider whether Mr. Badnall, senior, should bring the matter before a Court of Equity or await Captain Ellis to take action against him and then obtain an injunction to move it to a Court of Equity. Whether, since no agreement had been entered into between them, Badnall & Ellis could be said to be carrying on the business for their mutual profit. The last paragraph states that "Mr. H(enry) Cruso is now very ill. Is there any mode of taking and perpetuating his evidence so as to be used in a Court of Law or equity  with respect to the original agreement as to Mr Badnall lending his name..".

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REFERENCE 841 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Hay, Brecknockshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Laugharn; Bright;

DESCRIPTION Draft affidavit of debt, dated 22 February 1817, by Messrs Badnall & Laugharn against John Brights. Richard Badnall of Leek, Staffordshire, silk manufacturer, swore that John Bright of Hay, Brecknockshire, mercer, dealer & chapman, who had lately been made bankrupt, was indebted to him and his partner Thomas Laugharn of Leek in the sum of £4 -17s -3d for goods sold and delivered.

 

REFERENCE 842 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Macclesfield, Cheshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso; Saywell; Kirkman ;

DESCRIPTION Statement of debt sworn at Leek, Staffordshire in the Bankruptcy of James Saywell of Macclesfield, Cheshire, and Richard Kirkman of Wood Street, Cheapside, London, silk manufacturers, co-partners, dealers and chapmen trading under the name of Saywell Son & Kirkman, against whom a commission of bankruptcy had been issued. Richard Badnall of Leek, silk dyer, swore that before the date of the Commission of Bankruptcy Saywell and his partner owed him £720 -0s -6d for the dyeing of certain goods. Apart from a bill of exchange dated 30 April 1816 drawn by Badnall upon and accepted by Saywell and Kirkman payable to Sir John Lubbocks & Co. for the sum of £265- 18s and payable 3 months after the date to the order of Richard Badnall. The bill had been returned for non payment.

 

REFERENCE 843 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso; Coupland; Knight; Laugharn; Sneyd; Long; Austin; Samuel; Leyton;

DESCRIPTION Letter, dated 11 June 1818, from Messrs Long and Austin of Grays Inn, London to Messrs Cruso & Coupland solicitors, Leek, Staffordshire re various cases including (1) Badnall v Knight. It mentions that "the former writ has abated by the death of Mr. Laugharn you must therefore send up an affidavit of debt. (2) Leyton v Sneyd -concerns calling a special jury and states that in the City these are usually merchants -"Bankers are very difficult people to consult as to evidence". Mentions the possibility of the Elections interfering with the sittings of the Courts. A footnote that "we can initiate a search at the Rolls Court but you must let us know when the Rectory was granted to whom. (3) Badnall v Samuel concerns sending Cruso & Co. a copy of the answers and the case with Mr. Sugden's opinion by coach tomorrow.
Page
226

 

REFERENCE 844 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso; Littleton; Wrottesley; Robinson; Daintry; Canning;

DESCRIPTION Letter, dated 18 March 1824, from Richard Badnal, senior, at Leek, Staffordshire to John Cruso at the Grecian Coffee House, Strand, London re the Silk Trade. States his view as being unchanged i.e. that no men were ever worse treated than the Silk Manufacturers of England. and quoting Sir John Wrottesley, goes on to say they are treated as if they were not possessed of common sense and are totally unable to judge of their own interests. "A Petition was from this place sent by mail to Mr. Littleton to present to the house & Sir John Wrottesley had a copy of it & his support was requested. This Petition was not composed before 9 or 10 o'clock on Saturday night, in fact it was not thought of until after the arrival of the mail but it went off signed on Sunday Morning by about 1400 individuals. I hope Mr. Littleton would present it on this night, as a solemn protest against the crude theoretical measures of Parliament intended to be forced down peoples' throats whether they will or not. I should wish to ask Mr. Littleton and all the advocates of Free Trade why is it not to be general - Why should Corn be prohibited except at a price to suit Members of Parliament and the landed Interest generally. This affects the Population of the Country generally it is a necessity and should not be protected, if such Prohibitions as affect the Silk Trade are to be removed, which is an article of mere luxury and very little concern to the lower classes. Mr. Canning (to use his own phrase) may preach as long as he likes, but he will not easily persuade me, that as long as Corn is prohibited, the trade of the country is free. As to the opinion of many people that we can compete with the French in Silk Manufactory, I think they are not composed of those who are much interested in the Silk Trade -never was there a Petition more unanimously signed, than the one presented to the House by Mr. Baring from the Manufacturers of London - he talked about absent ones - dissentients- I sincerely wish Robinson and all his advocates had at least £50000 each in the Silk Trade - I should have little doubt of the Prohibition remaining and of the Trade being undisturbed in that case. I have little doubt that the Prohibition affecting corn will remain because perhaps they have £50000 worth of land. It is needless of me to repeat the arguments (unanswerable arguments) which are in the printed circular which has been distributed amongst the Members of the House. If they took the trouble to read them and can clear their brains from Free Trade Mania during the perusal, I think they would be convinced that the measures now pending in Parliament would in all probability ruin the Silk Trade of this Country and be of very little service eventually to the landed interest. I most devoutly hope that the Silk Trade will be firm in defending the ground inch by inch with Ministers both in the House of Commons & Lords and that they will not resign their Birth Right,( having been for generations sanctioned by the laws of their Country,) without a most determined and independent struggle. The Duty the Government talks of imposing would only increase smuggling, the Sale of foreign goods being legalised and as to competition with the French, when they pay one half less for their bread than is paid in this Country, we must not talk about it. Without your authority I should not mention your letter to the Trade here- for one concerned. I must however express my obligations to you for taking the trouble of seeing Mr. Littleton and for your good  intentions which during the present whirlwind of novelties and new fangled Parliamentary determinations, may be of use. All are well at Highfield and I believe at L:eek - remember me to Mrs J and Mrs Daintry. Richard Badnall.
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227

 

REFERENCE 845 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; Spital field, London; Macclesfield, Cheshire; Coventry, Warwickshire;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso; Littleton; Daintry; Davenport;

DESCRIPTION Letter, dated 13 March 1824, from Richard Badnall, senior, at Leek, Staffordshire to John Cruso at the Grecian Coffee House, Strand, London re the Silk Trade. Concerns his receipt of a letter with a copy of the Memorial to be presented to the Treasury; the Drawbacks to be allowed on stocks, etc. States that he proposes to lay the Memorial before the Trade at a meeting this evening. States that a letter is to go to Littleton asking him to use his influence to obtain the establishment of a depot at Leek for the examination, etc. "If a Custom House Officer is sent from London he can easily stop at Leek on his way to Macclesfield where, we are informed, there will be a Depot". It is decidedly the wish of the Trade that their sentiments should still be made known to the House of Commons, by their Petition.." Mr. Gaunt was also to address Mr. Littleton on the subject of Twist not included in the Drawback because there happens to be one fine end of Mohair to about 12 of silk. This article is principally manufactured in Leek and the loss upon it will be very considerable to any considerable manufacturer, more especially to Gaunt & Lucas, whose stock I understand is very large " Mr. Gaunt was said to be requesting Mr. Daintry's assistance and Badnall asks John Cruso to accompany Daintry to the meeting with Littleton. "Mr. Daintry has been used to the manufacture of it and can explain it better than any man in London". Daintry had apparently said he would be willing to go to London to verify his statements before the Chancellor of the Exchequer or any one else". He was also going to send two balls of twist one all silk and the other with one end of mohair in it called Rich Twist "it would take a good judge to tell the difference and thus some honesty in not wishing to take any advantage of its appearance." Badnall states he and Daintry always thought Davenport to be a Free Trade man and expressed his opinion that the weaving branch would be ruined. In his view "Peel's speech was most arrogant and unfeeling" and he would willingly set aside money if there was any chance of getting the measures set aside. "The trade is in the situation of a man robbed by a highwayman - when overpowered, he naturally makes the best bargain he can." With regard to Leek he goes on to say that " houses are broken into here almost every night. Trade is at a stand and poverty and misery are the consequences. What will it be then in three years hence if a journeyman weaver at Coventry now gets about 6/- a week - will he get 3/- when he comes to compete with the French -alas poor weavers. They should go into mourning in Spital Field - what the Devil are they illuminating for?" Richard Badnall goes on to say that all are well at Highfield "though I have a little of Pattison's complaint - Dear Mary is rather glum -you may guess the cause - remember me kindly to Henry and my thanks for your exertions in a fallen case..."

 

REFERENCE 846 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall;

DESCRIPTION Draft petition on behalf of the Silk Manufacturers and the proprietors and occupiers of lands, etc. in Leek, Staffordshire to the Honourable House of Commons in Parliament assembled. States that petitioners have been reduced from a state of prosperity to one of comparative indigence, that the manufactories which were flourishing and prosperous a year ago are in a lamentable state of decline and getting worse; traders and farmers in the town and neighbourhood are suffering proportiopnately; the workhouse overflows with paupers, the rate payers are most heavily oppressed and many who formerly paid are now reduced to the humiliating situation of soliciting relief themselves. The petitioners attributed the change to the legislation of 1824 legalising the admission of foreign silk "in July next". Were the necesssaries of liife as cheap in this Country as in France & were the duties payable on the articles used in the dyeing and printing trades and in other processes of the silk manufactory your petitioners would be most anxious and willing to compete with any foreign rival." Asks the House to repeal the act which allows the importation of foreign silks from July next. The draft appears from the handwriting to have been written by Richard Badnall of Highfield near Leek, Staffordshire.
Page
228

 

REFERENCE 847 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Daintry;

DESCRIPTION Draft notes concerning the special case of silk twist, drafted by Richard Badnall of Highfield, Leek for the Memorial to the House of Commons in 1824. It is written on the back of an old envelope addressed to Richard Badnall at Leek and dated London March fourteen 1824 which may have come from Daintry & Co together with a silk specification. A note in red ink states: " Returns of Twist belonging to Leek Silk Manufacturers according to official returns is of Silk & Mohair ....... of Silk & Worsted.....". The draft starts : Your memorialists submit this claim to an allowance on the three following articles - Lege Twist, Silk & Mohair & Silk & Worsted. The manufacture of Lege Twist is mainly confined to the Town of Leek - the article Silk & Mohair is used in the manufacture of Twist and that of Silk and Worsted in the manufacture of buttons. Your memorialists beg to state that the Lege Twist is composed wholly of silk, with the exception of one end of fine mohair - making the weight of silk in every pound of Twist at least one pound in the raw on which your Lordships will have allowed a drawback of 3/9. The article of Silk & Mohair and Silk & Worsted contain on an average, to the best of our knowledge & belief as Manufacturers, a proportion of more than one third clean silk, but less than half - in every lb. Your memorialists must ... reduce the article of Twist along with other goods & they humbly submit to your Lordships the very serious loss they must sustain if an adequate compensation is not allowed them. Your memorialists also submit to your Lordships consideration that this loss will be .... and cannot fall on the trade generally, the manufacture of these articles, as has been before stated, being principally confined to the Town of Leek. Your memorialists therefore humbly hope that as your Lordships have granted relief to the manufacturers of Bombazine and other goods mixed with silk you will also be pleased to allow this their appeal and grant them such remuneration as in your Lordships Wisdom & discretion you may think right and equitable and your memorialists will then pray....

 

REFERENCE 848 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Cruso;

DESCRIPTION Memorials to the Right Honourable Lords of the Treasury from the Silk Manufacturers of Leek, Staffordshire concerning payment of "drawback" for Lege Twist, Silk and Mohair and Silk and Worsted in connection with the Free Trade legislation of 1824. This is a fair copy of Bed. Coll. 847. One copy defines Lege Twist more specifically noting that occasionally the single end of silk is replaced by a single end of worsted and states that the amount of these articles in the hands of the manufacturers at Leek was 5430 pounds "as will appear by the account taken by the Officers appointed for the nspection of manufactured silk goods."

 

REFERENCE 849 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London; Dagenham, Essex;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Daintry; Hollins;

DESCRIPTION Memorial to the Right Honourable Lords of the Treasury from the Silk Manufacturers of Leek, Staffordshire concerning the Free Trade legislation of 1824. This states that Leek had been "for many years a very principal place for the manufacture of silk goods" and that the "memorialists have large capital employed in carrying on such manufacture." It also states that sales of silk goods are lower in winter than in summer and that the "memorialists" had expended large sums during the winter in manufacturing silks in anticipation of increased sales of silk goods during the spring "on which goods the high duties have been paid". The memorialists asked the Lords to defer their opinion on the proposed measure of introducing the manufactures silk goods of France into this country. They also pointed out that since the proposed reduction in the duties on raw silks the sale of manufactured silk goods had been almost entirely suspended and many orders for goods have been recalled with the intimation that unless a reduction equal to the amount of the proposed reduction in the duty on the raw material is made on the price of the manufactured silk goods they would decline purchasing any. This draft is written on the back of a draft deed involving Thomas Hollins the grandson of Samuel Hollins and John Smith Daintry one of Samuel Hollins trustees. It mentions lands at Dagenham and also the "Master and Wardens of a Grammar School".
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229

 

REFERENCE 850 LOCATION Transfer Box 49

PLACES Leek, Staffordshire; London;

FIELD NAMES

PERSONS Badnall; Daintry; Gaunt; Cruso; Littleton;

DESCRIPTION Letter, dated 17 March 1824, from Richard Gaunt to John Cruso at the Grecian Coffee House, Temple, London concerning the silk trade and the Free Trade legislation. Gaunt thanks Cruso for his letter and for all he has done on their behalf. States he expects the Mr.  Badnall will write to him and that he (Gaunt) had sent a parcel containing two balls of twist to Mr. Daintry but that it has either not arrived or Daintry is not in town "as neither you nor our worthy representative Mr.  Littleton mention it". The parcel was addressed to Tavistock Square and Gaunt expresses the wish that Cruso might get the parcel and see its contents as "I think the Chancellor should have it explained" as to how these differ from every other mixed brand of goods. Gaunt asks Cruso to forgive his writing the explanation for which is that he is "doing it while Telegraph is in the Street...will carry this draft for you." He asks Cruso to "learn and acquaint us what manufacturers will be allowed upon every pound of sewing silks, dyed and all silk twist not mixed twist- we cannot satisfy ourselves upon this head". A loose sheet (2) also written by Gaunt discusses the "two peculiar kinds or articles manufactured in the Town of Leek more especially the one called Lege Twist which is composed of silk alone excepting one fine thread of mohair with 12 threads of silk all made and thrown together to form one sewing thread and in some instances but very seldom, a superfine thread of worsted is substituted. " Lege twist was worth as much as pure silk twist on account of the extra cost of manufacture. Silk and mohair and silk worsted are composed of the same materials as Lege Twist but are not completed in the manufacture not being yet dyed.

 

 

 

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